exim (Makefile)

Opções para compilação do Exim

Categoria: Smtp/Pop

Software: exim

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Por: william de melo gueiros


Copie este Makefile que estou disponibilizando para o diretório Local do fonte do Exim. Já está com suporte a MySQL, os patchs estão todos corretos e o spool e o log devidamente configurados.


#################################
#          The Exim mail transport agent         #
#################################

# This is the template for Exim's main build-time configuration file. It
# contains settings that are independent of any operating system. It should
# be edited and then saved to a file called Local/Makefile before first running
# the make command.

# Things that depend on the operating system have default settings in
# OS/Makefile-Default, but these are overridden for some OS by files called
# called OS/Makefile-<osname>. You can further override these by creating files
# called Local/Makefile-<osname>, where "<osname>" stands for the name of your
# operating system - look at the names in the OS directory to see which names
# are recognized.

# However, if you are building Exim for a single OS only, you can place all the
# configuration settings in the one file called Local/Makefile; only if you are
# building for several OS from the same source files do you need to worry
# about splitting off the OS-dependent settings into separate files.

# One OS-specific thing is the C compiler; the overall default is gcc, but
# some OS Makefiles specify cc. You can override anything that is set by
# putting CC=whatever in your Local/Makefile.

# NOTE: You should never need to edit any of the distributed Makefiles; all
# overriding can be done in your Local/Makefile(s). This will make it easier
# for you when the next release comes along.

# The location of the X11 libraries is something else that is quite variable
# even between different versions of the same operation system (and indeed
# there are different versions of X11 as well, of course). The four settings
# concerned here are X11, XINCLUDE, XLFLAGS (linking flags) and X11_LD_LIB
# (dynamic run-time library).

# Another area of variability between systems is the type and location of the
# dbm library package. Exim has support for ndbm, gdbm, and Berkeley DB. By
# default it assumes ndbm; this often works with gdbm or DB, provided they
# are correctly installed, via their compatibility interfaces. However, Exim
# can also be configured to use the native calls for Berkeley DB 1.85 or
# Berkeley DB version 2.x, and this is defaulted for some operating systems.
# The defaults are set in OS/Makefile-Default, and can be changed by putting
# things into an OS-specific Makefile, or indeed into the main Local/Makefile
# if Exim is being compiled for a single OS only.

# See also the file doc/dbm.discuss.txt for discussion about different dbm
# libraries.

# In Local/Makefiles blank lines and lines starting with # are ignored. It is
# also permitted to use the # character to add a comment to a setting, for
# example
#
# EXIM_GID=42   # the "mail" group
#
# However, with some versions of "make" this works only if there is no white
# space between the end of the setting and the #, so it is probably best
# avoided. However, a consequence of this facility is that it is not possible
# to have the # character present in any setting, but I can't think of any
# cases where this would be wanted.
#################################


# /bin/sh is normally used as the shell in which to run commands that are
# defined in the makefiles. This can be changed if necessary, but note that
# a Bourne-compatible shell is expected.

# MAKE_SHELL=/bin/sh


# The following commands live in different places in some OS. The OS-specific
# files should normally point to the right place, but they can be overridden
# here if necessary. Perl is not necessary for running Exim unless you set
# EXIM_PERL (see below) to get it embedded, but there are some Perl utilities
# for processing log files. If you haven't got Perl, Exim will still build and
# run; you just won't be able to run those utilities.

 CHOWN_COMMAND=/usr/bin/chown
 CHGRP_COMMAND=/usr/bin/chgrp
# MV_COMMAND=/bin/mv
# RM_COMMAND=/bin/rm
# PERL_COMMAND=/usr/bin/perl


# The following macro can be used to change the command for building a library
# of functions. By default the "ar" command is used, with options "cq".

# AR=ar cq


# Exim has some support for the AUTH extension of SMTP (RFC 2554). If you want
# to use this you must uncomment at least one of the following macros so that
# appropriate code is included in the binary. You then need to set up the
# runtime configuration to make use of the mechanism(s) selected.

 AUTH_CRAM_MD5=yes
 AUTH_PLAINTEXT=yes


# The binary directory: This variable defines where the exim binary will be
# installed by "make install" or "exim_install". It is also used internally
# by exim when it needs to re-invoke itself, either to send an error message,
# or to recover root privilege. Exim's utility binaries and scripts are also
# installed in this directory. There is no default for this variable built into
# the source files; it must be set in one of the local configuration files.

BIN_DIRECTORY=/usr/sbin


# The default distribution of Exim contains only the plain text form of the
# documentation. Other forms are available separately. If you want to install
# the documentation in "info" format, first fetch the Texinfo documentation
# sources from the ftp directory and unpack them, which should create files
# with the extension "texinfo" in the doc directory. Then set INFO_DIRECTORY to
# your info directory; "make install" will then build the info files and
# install them there.

# INFO_DIRECTORY=/usr/local/info


# The compress command is used by the exicyclog script to compress old log
# files. Both the name of the command and the suffix that it adds to files
# need to be defined here. See also the EXICYCLOG_MAX configuration.

COMPRESS_COMMAND=/usr/bin/gzip
COMPRESS_SUFFIX=gz


# If the exigrep utility is fed compressed log files, it tries to uncompress
# them using this command.

ZCAT_COMMAND=/usr/bin/bzcat


# The runtime configuration file: This variable defines where Exim's runtime
# configuration file is. There is no default built into the source files, so
# there must be a setting in one of the local configuration files. The
# location of all other runtime files and directories can be changed in the
# runtime configuration file.

CONFIGURE_FILE=/etc/exim/exim.conf


# In some installations there may be multiple machines sharing file systems,
# where a different configuration file is required for Exim on the different
# machines. If CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_NODE is defined, then Exim will first look
# for a configuration file whose name is that defined by CONFIGURE_FILE,
# with the node name obtained by uname() tacked on the end, separated by a
# period (for example, /usr/exim/configure.host.in.some.domain. If this file
# does not exist, then the bare configuration file name is tried.

# CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_NODE=yes


# In some esoteric configurations two different versions of Exim are run,
# with different setuid values, and different configuration files are required
# to handle the different cases. If CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_EUID is defined, then
# Exim will first look for a configuration file whose name is that defined
# by CONFIGURE_FILE, with the effective uid tacked on the end, separated by
# a period (for eximple, /usr/exim/configure.0). If this file does not exist,
# then the bare configuration file name is tried. In the case when both
# CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_EUID and CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_NODE are set, four files
# are tried: <name>.<euid>.<node>, <name>.<node>, <name>.<euid>, and <name>.

# CONFIGURE_FILE_USE_EUID=yes


# The size of the delivery buffer: This specifies the size of buffer which is
# used when copying a message from the spool to a destination. The default
# value built into the source is 8192.

# DELIVER_BUFFER_SIZE=8192


# Included directors: These variables determine which individual director
# drivers are included in the Exim binary. There are no defaults; those that
# are wanted must be defined here by setting the appropriate variables to the
# value "yes". The actions of each director are described in a separate chapter
# in the manual. Including a director in the binary does not cause it to
# be used automatically. It has also to be specified in the runtime
# configuration file.

DIRECTOR_ALIASFILE=yes
DIRECTOR_FORWARDFILE=yes
DIRECTOR_LOCALUSER=yes
DIRECTOR_SMARTUSER=yes


# The mode of the database directory: Exim creates a directory called "db"
# in its spool directory, to hold its databases of hints. This variable
# determines the mode of the created directory. The default value in the
# source is 0750.

# DB_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750


# Database file mode: The mode of files created in the "db" directory defaults
# to 0640 in the source, and can be changed here.

# DB_MODE=0640


# Database lock file mode: The mode of zero-length files created in the "db"
# directory to use for locking purposes defaults to 0640 in the source, and
# can be changed here.

# DB_LOCKFILE_MODE=0640


# Cycling log files: this variable specifies the maximum number of old
# log files that are kept by the exicyclog log-cycling script.

EXICYCLOG_MAX=10


# Running Exim without it being root all the time: A uid and gid for Exim can
# be specified here, and this is strongly recommended. These values are
# compiled into the binary. It is possible to change them by settings in the
# runtime configuration file, but setting them here is preferred. If EXIM_UID
# is not defined, the default in the code is to run as root (unless specified
# otherwise at run time) except when doing local deliveries, when it always
# runs as the appropriate local user. Specifying 0 at run time has the effect
# of unsetting the values build into the binary.

# Setting EXIM_GID without setting EXIM_UID has no effect.

# The settings here must be numeric; the run time file allows names to
# be used. When this uid and gid are set, the Exim binary still has to be
# setuid root if local deliveries are to be performed or a listener on port
# 25 is to be run, but it gives up its privilege when possible. There is a
# trade-off between security and efficiency, controlled by the runtime
# "security" setting, which controls how privilege is released (setuid vs
# seteuid).

# EXIM_UID=
# EXIM_GID=


# Compiling the Exim monitor: If you want to compile the Exim monitor,
# a program that requires an X11 display, then EXIM_MONITOR should be
# set to the value "eximon.bin". Comment out this setting to disable
# compilation of the binary file that is run by the eximon script. The
# locations of various X11 directories for libraries and include files
# are defaulted in the OS/Makefile-Default file, and can be overridden
# in local OS-specific make files.

EXIM_MONITOR=eximon.bin


# Compiling in support for embedded Perl: If you want to be able to
# use Perl code in Exim's string manipulation language and you have Perl
# (version 5.004 or later) installed, set EXIM_PERL to perl.o.

# EXIM_PERL=perl.o


# There are also three options which are used when compiling the Perl interface
# and when linking with Perl. The default values for these are placed
# automatically at the head of the Makefile by the script which builds it.
# However, if you want to override them, you can do so here.

# PERL_CC=
# PERL_CCOPTS=
# PERL_LIBS=


# This parameter sets the maximum length of the header portion of a message
# that Exim is prepared to process. The default setting is one megabyte. There
# is a limit in order to catch rogue mailers that might connect to your SMTP
# port, start off a header line, and then just pump junk at it for ever. The
# message_size_limit option would also catch this, but it may not be set.

# HEADER_MAXSIZE="(1024*1024)"


# The mode of the input directory: The input directory is where messages are
# kept while awaiting delivery. Exim creates it if necessary, using a mode
# which can be defined here (default 0750).

# INPUT_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750


# Exim log directory and files: Exim creates several log files inside a
# single log directory. You can define the directory and the form of the
# log file name here, by setting LOG_FILE_PATH to a path name containing one
# occurrence of %s. This will be replaced by one of the strings "main",
# "panic", or "reject" to form the final file name. For example, some
# installations may want something like this:

LOG_FILE_PATH=/var/log/exim_%slog

# which results in files with names /var/log/exim_mainlog, etc. The directory
# in which the log files are placed must exist; Exim does not try to create
# it for itself. It is also your responsibility to ensure that Exim is capable
# of writing files using this path name. If you have defined EXIM_UID and
# EXIM_GID above, then that uid and gid must be able to create files in the
# directory you have specified.

# You can also configure Exim to use syslog, instead of or as well as log
# files, by settings such as these

# LOG_FILE_PATH=syslog
# LOG_FILE_PATH=syslog:/var/log/exim_%slog

# Do not include white space in such a setting as it messes up the building
# process.

# You do not have to define the log file path here; an option in the runtime
# configuration file can also set it, and that overrides any setting here.
# However, it is recommended that you set it here if it is a fixed path, so
# that it is available right from the start of Exim's execution. Otherwise,
# errors detected early on, for example errors in the configuration file,
# cannot be logged.

# If you do not set LOG_FILE_PATH here or in the runtime configuration, Exim
# creates a directory called "log" inside its spool directory (see
# SPOOL_DIRECTORY below) and uses that with filenames "mainlog", "paniclog",
# etc. Its mode defaults to 0750 but that can be changed here.

# LOG_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750

# This value is used only when Exim creates the directory for itself.

# The log files themselves are created as required, with a mode that defaults
# to 0640, but which can be changed here.

# LOG_MODE=0640


# Included file and database lookup methods. See the manual chapter entitled
# "File and database lookups" for discussion. DBM and lsearch (linear search)
# are included by default. LOOKUP_DNSDB does *not* refer to general mail
# routing using the DNS. It is for the specialist case of using the DNS as
# a general database facility (not common). For details of cdb files and the
# tools to build them, see http://www.pobox.com/~djb/cdb.html.

LOOKUP_DBM=yes
LOOKUP_LSEARCH=yes

 LOOKUP_CDB=yes
 LOOKUP_DNSDB=yes
# LOOKUP_LDAP=yes
 LOOKUP_MYSQL=yes
 LOOKUP_NIS=yes
# LOOKUP_NISPLUS=yes
# LOOKUP_PGSQL=yes

# Additional libraries and include directories may be required for some
# lookup styles, e.g. LDAP, MYSQL or PGSQL. LOOKUP_LIBS is included only on
# the command for linking Exim itself, not on any auxiliary programs. You
# don't need to set LOOKUP_INCLUDE if the relevant directories are already
# specified in INCLUDE.

 LOOKUP_INCLUDE=-I /usr/local/ldap/include -I /usr/include/mysql
 LOOKUP_LIBS=-L/usr/local/lib -lldap -llber -lmysqlclient -lpq

# If you have set LDAP=yes, you should set LDAP_LIB_TYPE to indicate which LDAP
# library you have. Unfortunately, though most of their functions are the
# same, there are minor differences. Currently Exim knows about four LDAP
# libraries: the one from the University of Michigan (also known as OpenLDAP 1),
# OpenLDAP 2, the Netscape SDK library, and the library that comes with Solaris
# 7 onwards. Uncomment whichever of these you are using.

# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=UMICHIGAN
# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=OPENLDAP1
# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=OPENLDAP2
# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=NETSCAPE
# LDAP_LIB_TYPE=SOLARIS

# If you don't set any of these, Exim assumes the original University of
# Michigan (OpenLDAP 1) library.


# The TESTDB lookup is for performing tests on the handling of lookup
# results, and is not useful for general running. It should be included
# only when debugging the code of Exim.

# LOOKUP_TESTDB=yes


# Network interfaces: Unless you set the local_interfaces option in the runtime
# configuration file to restrict Exim to certain interfaces only, it will run
# code to find all the interfaces there are on your host. Unfortunately,
# the call to the OS that does this requires a buffer large enough to hold
# data for all the interfaces - it was designed of course in the days when a
# host rarely had more than three or four at most. Nowadays hosts can have
# very many virtual interfaces running on the same hardware. If you have more
# than 250 virtual interfaces, you will need to uncomment this setting and
# increase the value.

# MAXINTERFACES=250


# Per-message logs: While a message is in the process of being delivered,
# comments on its progress are written to a message log, for the benefit of
# human administrators. These logs are held in a directory called "msglog"
# in the spool directory. Its mode defaults to 0750, but can be changed here.
# The message log directory is also used for storing files that are used by
# transports for returning data to a message's sender (see the "return_output"
# option for transports).

# MSGLOG_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750


# Identifying the daemon: When an Exim daemon starts up, it writes its pid to
# a file so that it can easily be identified. The path of the file can be
# specified here. It must contain precisely one occurrence of "%s". When
# a daemon is run on the default SMTP port, this is replaced with the null
# string, but when it is run with some explicit port specified, "%s" is
# replaced with the port number preceded by a dot. If a daemon is run with
# only one of -bd and -q<time>, then that option is added on to the end of
# the file name, allowing sites that run two separate daemons to distinguish
# them. Some installations may want something like this

PID_FILE_PATH=/var/run/exim/exim%s.pid

# If PID_FILE_PATH is not defined, Exim writes a file in its spool directory
# (see SPOOL_DIRECTORY below) with the name "exim-daemon.pid" for the standard
# daemon, or "exim-daemon.<port>.pid" for a daemon listening on a non-standard
# port. If you run a daemon that does not have both the -bd and -q options,
# then whichever of the two options it does have is added to the file name,
# whether obtained from PID_FILE_PATH or by default.

# The pid file path does not have to be set here; it can be also be set by an
# option in the runtime configuration file, which takes precedence over any
# setting here.


# Included routers: These variables determine which individual router drivers
# are included in the Exim binary. There are no defaults; those that are
# wanted must be defined here by setting the appropriate variables to the value
# "yes". The actions of each router are described in a separate chapter
# in the manual. Including a router in the binary does not cause it to
# be used automatically. It has also to be specified in the runtime
# configuration file. Those routers that are *not* wanted must not be defined
# here at all - comment them out.

ROUTER_DOMAINLIST=yes
ROUTER_IPLITERAL=yes
ROUTER_LOOKUPHOST=yes
ROUTER_QUERYPROGRAM=yes

# This one is very special-purpose, so is not included by default.

 ROUTER_IPLOOKUP=yes


# The spool directory: This directory is where all the data for messages in
# transit is kept. There is no default in the source, so its location must be
# defined in a local compile-time configuration file, or in the runtime
# configuration. It is recommended (but not mandatory) that you define it here
# if it is a fixed path, especially if you have not defined LOG_FILE_PATH. Log
# files are then written in a sub-directory of the spool directory, and it is
# helpful to have this defined right from the start of execution so that, for
# example, errors in reading the runtime configuration file can be logged.

# Exim creates the spool directory if it does not exist. If a non-root uid and
# gid have been defined for Exim (either in this configuration file, or by the
# runtime configuration options), then this directory and all sub-directories
# and their files will be created with their owners and groups set to Exim's
# uid and gid.

# Many installations will want something like this:
 SPOOL_DIRECTORY=/var/spool/exim

# Others may prefer to keep all Exim things under one directory:
# SPOOL_DIRECTORY=/usr/exim/spool


# If Exim creates the spool directory, it is given this mode, defaulting in the
# source to 0750.

# SPOOL_DIRECTORY_MODE=0750


# The mode of files on the input spool which hold the contents of message can
# be changed here. The default is 0600. If you have defined a uid and gid for
# Exim and want information from the spool to be available to anyone who is a
# member of the Exim group, change the value to 0640. This is particularly
# relevant if you are going to run the Exim monitor.

# SPOOL_MODE=0600


# If STDERR_FILE is defined then the -df command line option causes Exim to
# redirect stderr to the named file. This is useful for catching debugging
# output when starting Exim via inetd.

# STDERR_FILE=


# The appendfile transport can write messages as individual files in a number
# of formats. The code for three specialist formats, maildir, mailstore, and
# MBX, is included only when requested by the following settings:

SUPPORT_MAILDIR=yes
SUPPORT_MAILSTORE=yes
# SUPPORT_MBX=yes


# Moving frozen messages: If the following is uncommented, Exim is compiled
# with support for automatically moving frozen messages out of the main spool
# directory, a facility that is found useful by some large installations. A
# runtime option is required to cause the moving actually to occur. Such
# messages become "invisible" to the normal management tools.

# SUPPORT_MOVE_FROZEN_MESSAGES=yes


# Support for PAM (Pluggable Authentication Modules), a facility
# which is available in the latest releases of Solaris and in some GNU/Linux
# distributions (see http://ftp.at.kernel.org/pub/linux/libs/pam/). The Exim
# support, which is intended for use in conjunction with the SMTP AUTH
# facilities, is included only when requested by the following setting:

SUPPORT_PAM=yes

# You probably need to add -lpam to EXTRALIBS, and in some releases of
# GNU/Linux -ldl is also needed.


# Exim can be built to support the SMTP STARTTLS command, which implements
# Transport Layer Security using SSL (Secure Sockets Layer). To do this, you
# must install the OpenSSL library package. Exim contains no cryptographic
# code of its own. Uncomment the following lines if you want to build Exim
# with TLS support.

# SUPPORT_TLS=yes
# TLS_LIBS=-lssl -lcrypto

# If you are running Exim as a server, note that just building it with TLS
# support is not usually all you need to do. You normally need to set up a
# suitable certificate, and tell Exim about it by means of the tls_certificate
# and tls_privatekey runtime options. You also need to set tls_advertise_hosts
# to specify which hosts TLS support is advertised to. On the other hand,
# if you are running Exim only as a client, building it with TLS support
# is all you need to do.

# Additional libraries and include files are required for OpenSSL. The TLS_LIBS
# setting above assumes that the libraries are installed with all your other
# libraries. If they are in a special directory, you may need something like

# TLS_LIBS=-L/usr/local/openssl/lib -lssl -lcrypto

# TLS_LIBS is included only on the command for linking Exim itself, not on any
# auxiliary programs. If the include files are not in a standard place, you can
# set TLS_INCLUDE to specify where they are:

# TLS_INCLUDE=-I/usr/local/openssl/include/

# You don't need to set TLS_INCLUDE if the relevant directories are already
# specified in INCLUDE.


# Included transports: These variables determine which individual transport
# drivers are included in the Exim binary. There are no defaults; those that
# are wanted must be defined here by setting the appropriate variables to the
# value "yes". The actions of each transport are described in a separate chapter
# in the manual. Including a transport in the binary does not cause it to
# be used automatically. It has also to be specified in the runtime
# configuration file.

TRANSPORT_APPENDFILE=yes
TRANSPORT_AUTOREPLY=yes
TRANSPORT_PIPE=yes
TRANSPORT_SMTP=yes

# This one is special-purpose, and commonly not required, so do not include
# it by default.

TRANSPORT_LMTP=yes


# TCP wrappers: If you want to use tcpwrappers from within Exim, uncomment
# this setting. See the manual section entitled "Use of tcpwrappers" in the
# chapter on building and installing Exim.

# USE_TCP_WRAPPERS=yes

# End of EDITME
  


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